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garibaldo''

Member
Mar 10, 2024
21
12
Hi,
Iḿ from Brazil, nickname gariba, or garibaldo, 30+ years professionally working photography and films, advertising work, mostly... Migrating to windows from Mac since 2023, looking to learn more with you here... And to be of some help... Sorry my poor english....
 
Hi,
Iḿ from Brazil, nickname gariba, or garibaldo, 30+ years professionally working photography and films, advertising work, mostly... Migrating to windows from Mac since 2023, looking to learn more with you here... And to be of some help... Sorry my poor english....

Welcome garibaldo! ;) :D
 
Olá Balding Gary! I thought to welcome you with an image of your namesake Garibaldi, which led me down this tangential rabbit hole
An argument which has raged for more than a century over rumors that a hard-pressed Abraham Lincoln appealed to Giuseppe Garibaldi to save the Union in the American Civil War appears to have been settled after the discovery of documentary proof in Garibaldi's own handwriting.
The article then goes on to say that the proof was a small postcard which was found among the royal papers of the exiled House of Savoy which were donated to the state archives in Turin. The postcard was addressed from Garibaldi to Victor Emmanuel II, King of Piedmont-Sardinia, and later King of the united Italy. In it, Garibaldi sought permission to accept the offer to command the American armies. I did a little digging and found the translated text of the postcard here:

Sire, the President of the United States is offering me the command of that army. I find myself obliged to accept this mission for a country of which I am a citizen. Nevertheless before making my decision I thought it was my duty to inform Your Majesty, and to know if you think that I might have the honor of serving him. I have the honor to say that I am the most devoted servant of your Majesty. [Taken from: Garibaldi: Democracy and Civil Rights, p. 47]
And Victor Emmanuel responded as follows:

Do what you are inspired to do by your conscience, which is always your sole guide in affairs of such grave portent, and whatever decision you take, I am certain that you will not forget the dear Italian patria which is always utmost in your own and my thoughts. [Taken from: Garibaldi: Democracy and Civil Rights, p. 47]1710194795888.jpeg

Of course if you are Catholico, then he is a pirate, brigand, and devilish socialista!
 
@philalethes Are you sure that invitation was from Lincoln? Garibaldi fought a 10 years independence war here in Brazil, against the Emperor, before going back to UNITE Italy, and became known as "Hero of Two Worlds"... By the way, garibaldo is just the name of Big Bird in Brazil's portuguese version of Sesame Street... 8=D
 
I dug deeper. It appears an American consult bypassed the normal diplomatic channels and approached Garibaldi directly...for which he was later fired. Garibaldi was admired as the "Washington of Italy" and seen as a great hero in America. Garibaldi has expressed interest in serving the USA...if the King would let him go.
This put Lincoln's government in an awkward position to recover from the consul's misstep, and to not insult such a popular hero;, and so they took a diplomatic approach. As Wikipedia notes.

"Garibaldi expressed interest in aiding the Union, and he was offered a major general's commission in the U.S. Army through a letter from Secretary of State William H. Seward to Henry Shelton Sanford, the U.S. Minister at Brussels, 27 July 1861.[7] On 9 September 1861, Sanford met with Garibaldi and reported the result of the meeting to Seward:


He said that the only way in which he could render service, as he ardently desired to do, to the cause of the United States, was as Commander-in-chief of its forces, that he would only go as such, and with the additional contingent power—to be governed by events—of declaring the abolition of slavery—that he would be of little use without the first, and without the second it would appear like a civil war in which the world at large could have little interest or sympathy.[35]
In USA the Command in chief is the President and Garibaldi could not be given a totally free hand to run the war as he dictated.

I found a deeper dive on JStor behind a paywall. I managed to breech the wall and here is a link to the full article up on my Google drive
 
Btw here is a clever trick I came across to get around paywalls.
Take an address like https://www.somesite.com, replace the www. with archive.is/
If they don't have it already, then click on option to archive that URL, and watch it in real-time parse its way through a maze of html components to deliver up the full article. Nifty.
 
Hi,
Iḿ from Brazil, nickname gariba, or garibaldo, 30+ years professionally working photography and films, advertising work, mostly... Migrating to windows from Mac since 2023, looking to learn more with you here... And to be of some help... Sorry my poor english....
Welcome
 
Btw here is a clever trick I came across to get around paywalls.
Take an address like https://www.somesite.com, replace the www. with archive.is/
If they don't have it already, then click on option to archive that URL, and watch it in real-time parse its way through a maze of html components to deliver up the full article. Nifty.
I have been using print friendly for some time, it is hit or miss, mostly hit. Gonna have to give this a try, thanks.
 
I have Print Friendly & PDF extension on Firefox for printing PDF of webpages. You don't mean that, right? How could it get past paywalls?
But the extension I like the most is SingleFile, rolls up entire page into one html file with images embedded. No more file + folder like when you Save a webpage.
 
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