Windows Update deleted my Linux partition?

Williamm

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Jun 27, 2020
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Hello.
I use a Lenovo laptop where I had W10 and Ubuntu on different partitions. It would let me choose between W10 and Linux upon startup and would boot into Linux by default.

After a long update last night, my PC boots directly into Windows (no more bootloader screen). I still see the 60GB partition as "primary partition" but I can't manage to boot into Linux anymore.

The laptop is almost new, and neither of the OS were presenting malfunctions.

I tried restoring to the previos Windows update and it didn't work, and sadly I didn't have a system restore point.

Is there anything I can do? How can something like this be so arbitrary?
 

cndps

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DVDR_Dog

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I read a report recently that a major update (2004?) cleans up after itself a little too well taking out some important stuff. You may have been a victim of that.
Let me hunt around tomorrow morning and see what I Can find.
I’ll add it on as an edit to this thread.
 
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jamvaru

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Jun 23, 2012
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after doing the multiboot thing i've decided to just use linux from a removable drive
usb 3.0 is more than fast enough and you can use an SSD in a drive enclosure for speeds equal to anything possible inside the computer, even the M.2 type (there are drive enclosures for this as well)
.
my comp is 1 ssd 1 dvd 4 hdd (windows stripe - faster game loads)
no room for linux
i could use some of the hdd for it, but really... that would be slower than the usb option, with a stick or ssd
or i could split up the ssd, but what if it fails? then i lose 2 OS at the same time; and i'd need a bigger ssd really, mine is only 120g
.
you can get a keychain USB 3.x drive to put your linux on
.
if you put the linux on a separate hard drive or internal drive then you can use the bios to choose the boot option rather than relying on 'grub'

also, there are versions of linux that can install on the same drive/partition as windows, i think you run them from within windows, but not sure; probably some linux loader that can load windows or linux; or both options, pretty much anything you can imagine is being done with linux
 
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